Salesforce_Logo_2009 (1)Originally posted on PandoDaily by Jamie Grenney

When I joined Salesforce.com in 2002, the question we were trying to answer was “Why isn’t all enterprise software as easy to use as Amazon.com?” That simple idea gave rise to a billion dollar business.

The cloud-computing model was so disruptive because it dramatically reduced the risk and lowered the total cost of ownership for software. For the first time, companies of all sizes were able to successfully adopt CRM systems. Today I believe we are on the precipice of another disruptive shift. One that is going to unfold quickly and unlock huge productivity gains for companies.

Primary Responsibilities

The product marketer we’re hiring will be responsible for developing Infer’s positioning and messaging as well as shaping our marketing strategy. They’ll lead Infer’s pipeline generation efforts and develop new integrated campaigns and assets. At Infer, you’ll have the opportunity to define an exciting new category and build a brand from scratch. In this startup environment, you’ll get to own PR initiatives, events, website messaging, design projects, partnerships, and sales enablement.

Professional Experience / Required Skills

  • 4+ years experience in product marketing for a high tech company
  • Bachelor’s degree or equivalent
  • MBA is a plus, but we also like bright people who didn’t go to business school
  • Charismatic, innovative, creative
  • Exceptional team player with proven ability to lead through influence
  • Proven track record in crafting compelling positioning and thought leadership
  • Strong written communication skills and an eye for design
  • Understanding of CRM & Marketing Automation space is a plus

Originally posted on Destination CRM by Jamie Grenney

Interent Trend 2Internet forecaster Mary Meeker has produced a report on Internet trends for almost 20 years, and it never fails to uncover valuable insights on the current state of technology. Her latest report includes many observations about the worlds of mobile, data, advertising, and more.

The biggest trend in the just-released report is the massive increase in mobile and sensor-based devices, and in the data produced by them. Meeker found that shipments of sensors for wearables, phones, tablets, etc., have grown by 32 percent year-over-year, up to 8 billion in 2013. And mobile data traffic is increasing at an annual rate of 81 percent, although smartphones still only represent 30 percent of the 5.2 billion mobile phones in use.

Google-Genius-InferWhen you’re in crazy startup mode like us, you don’t often get a chance to sit back and reflect on the things that make it all possible. After growing our engineering team by 160% in the past quarter with amazing Google-caliber talent, we thought we’d take a moment to celebrate the team.

As anyone who works in Silicon Valley knows, the battle for talent here is as heated as ever, and it’s not easy – especially in the enterprise space – to compete with all the other hot startups out there for the best engineers. But building the right core team is critical to hiring more great engineers, because smart people attract smart people. As a matter of fact;

eng-phd

Infer DNA

As the predictive space heats up, it’s important to understand the DNA of your technology partners and be comfortable that you’re aligning yourself with the vendors who will win. In our case, we’re proud that Infer reflects our collective experiences at both Google and Salesforce. With three founders hailing from Google, and key advisors and early employees from Salesforce, we’ve learned a ton from these hugely successful companies.

What’s in our Google DNA?

1) Focus

Google won the battle for search in large part because it was focused. While AOL and Yahoo! viewed themselves as portals that happened to have search boxes, Google focused their energy on delivering amazing search results. After our founder Vik looked at all the different challenges B2B companies face, he took a similar approach and focused in on the one where we could unlock the most value.

My co-founders and I were ecstatic — we had just closed our $10m Series A round with top investors. Our two years of developing a great product in stealth mode and achieving profitability with key customers had culminated into a fantastic financing milestone. We finalized a launch date and put the wheels in motion for our first press announcement and coming out party. Little did we know we were about to begin a whirlwind roller coaster ride, during which we re-branded our company in just four weeks – naming, logo, website and all.

During my startup’s early days, we had little time to prioritize branding. In fact, we initially incorporated the company as “Party On Data,” which in introductory meetings would always result in ten minutes of questions about why. Soon after, we renamed our company to “Slice Data” and purchased slice-data.com (because slicedata.com wasn’t available). During our preparation for launch, it occurred to me that we should get the hyphen-less URL now that we had the funds, so I checked the domain again and it looked like a ghost town owned by two young guys in India. I figured the U.S. dollar would go far there, and we’d be able to purchase it fairly easily and quickly. Boy was I wrong.

State of Modern MarketingLast night I had the opportunity to moderate a panel discussion at Nitro with marketing leaders from three amazing companies, each at different stages of growth. Zendesk had a successful IPO earlier this month, New Relic is clearly on that path, and RelateIQ has raised nearly $60M to compete for a share of the CRM market.

Our discussion was framed around “bright spots.” To be a successful marketer you often have to look outside your organization for inspiration. Who has had success? How did they do it? And why did it work so well? While you can follow the lead of your direct competitors, the most innovative companies expand their network and draw inspiration from bright spots they uncover.

Below are some of the highlights from our conversation.

A lot of people have asked us to pull back the curtain on how we build our predictive models. This two minute video provides a simple, step-by-step explanation. If you have question or want to learn more contact us, and we’d be happy to help.

We’re excited to sponsor Pulse this week, the leading conference for customer success. The companies presenting include Gainsight, Zuora, Box, Zendesk, Tableau, Dropbox, Salesforce, Marketo, and Xactly. These are some of the fastest growing companies on the planet and many of them are also Infer customers.

If you’re at the conference this week let us know. We’d love to connect. @inferinc #customersuccess

Appirio

Originally posted on TheNextWebbrainstorm-idea-730x503

The first product manager (PM) is a crucial unicorn hire that no startup should compromise on. The reason is simple – your PM is responsible for managing your team’s most precious resource: time.

Unfortunately, nearly everyone seems to think they’d make a great PM (engineers, consultants, you name it), but the reality is that most folks just can’t hack it. I’ve worked with countless PMs at huge companies like Yahoo and Google, and over the past two months have interviewed over twenty PM candidates.